The Cape Naturaliste Library is open Monday to Friday - 8.30 am to 4.30pm

It is closed at Recess and open at Lunchtime.The Library collection caters for all reading levels and interests from year 7 through to year 12.

You can also browse the library collection from home @: cnc.librarysolutions.com.au

FICTION

The fiction collection has recently been updated with genre labels so you can easily locate the type of books you like to read. 

We have an extensive, up to date fiction collection, which features all of the most popular authors, the classics and award winning books.

NON-FICTION

Our non-fiction collection has been developed to support the Australian curriculum.

MAGAZINES

The library has a fantastic range of magazines for the students to enjoy whilst in the library. 

DESKTOP COMPUTERS

In order to support their learning, students are able to use these computers during class and lunchtimes.

OTHER COOL STUFF

The library also supports different groups and activities that occur at the college such as:

Write a Book in a Day                                                                                              

Talented Young Writers Program

Visiting Speakers and Extra-Curricular Activities

Book Week

Science Week

R U OK Day

Knitting and other activities

MULTI-PURPOSE

At the moment Media students often use the library as a recording studio…you might even see the next Steven Spielberg!

Our Arts Learning Area is comprised of programs in Drama, Media, Music and Visual Arts. In Years 7 students rotate through each of these disciplines so that they develop a strong foundation for continued learning and skill development. In Year 8-10 students continue with they Arts Program by choosing subjects they are passionate in that can prepare them for WACE or Certificate courses in Years 11 and 12.

Media Arts prepares students for a future in a digital and interconnected world by developing their creative skills, appreciation and knowledge of media techniques and technologies so they can explore their world, create their own stories and interpret the stories of others.

Students work individually and collaboratively to create and produce media works that demonstrate their understandings of key media concepts and technical expertise.

 

Year 7 Media

Students are provided with opportunities to view media works within the context of a selected focus. They make and respond to media productions within the selected media type, genre or style studied and are taught to use basic media production skills and processes.

Students learn how to problem-solve, work as a team and to follow timelines. They use processes and strategies to ensure safe and responsible use of all media equipment.

Media focus options: advertising (for example, television commercials, film trailers, magazine advertising, film posters), mass media (for example, commercial television, blockbuster films, video games) or press (for example, television news, newspapers, current affairs) and broadcasting (for example, marketing campaigns, commercial radio, commercial podcasts).


Year 8 Media

Media Students in Year 8 will be introduced to concepts and skills associated with the study and practice of the media. The focus of the course is to develop an understanding of how Narrative is constructed in various forms of the Media. A wide range of tasks expose students to the use of digital camera and professional editing programmes to enable them the enjoyable experience of planning and producing their own short films and other works.   

Students will be introduced to concepts and skills associated with the study and practice of the media. The focus of the course is to develop an understanding of how Narrative is constructed in various forms of the Media. A wide range of tasks expose students to the use of digital camera and professional editing programmes to enable them the enjoyable experience of planning and producing their own short films and other works.   

Students are given further opportunities to view media works within the context of the selected focus. They make and respond to their own media productions and those of their peers within the selected media type, genre or style studied, building on media production skills and processes from previous years.

Media focus options: advertising (for example, billboard, 'junk' mail advertising, radio advertising), mass media (for example, blockbuster CGI film, specialist magazines, feature articles) or press (for example, newsletters, news magazine, journalistic photography) and broadcasting (for example, news channels, special interest programs, interactive entertainment).


Year 9 Media

Students continue to refine viewing of media works within the context of the selected focus. They make and respond to their own media productions and those of others within the selected media type, genre or style studied and further develop their media production skills and processes.

Media focus options may be either Media Fiction (for example, TV fiction, comics and graphic novels, magazines) or Media Non-Fiction (for example, documentaries, news stories, current affairs stories).


Year 10 Media

In Year 10, students are introduced to analysis of media works within the context of the selected focus. They continue to make and respond to their own media productions and professional media works within the selected media type, genre or style studied, using refined media production skills and processes.

Teachers are required to address knowledge and skills in Media Arts through two of the foci and media below.

Media foci are: Media Fiction (for example, narrative focused video games, celebrities in media fiction, Hollywood or Bollywood films) and Media Non-Fiction (for example, educational programs, wiki site blogs, photographic essays).
SENIOR SCHOOL – MEDIA PRODUCTION AND ANALYSIS
ATAR
The Media Production and Analysis ATAR course aims to prepare students for a future in a digital and interconnected world by providing the skills, knowledge and understandings to tell their own stories and interpret the stories of others. Students are encouraged to explore, experiment and interpret their world, reflecting and analysing contemporary life, while understanding that this is done under social, cultural and institutional constraints.  Students, as users and creators of media products, consider the important role of audiences and their context. This course focuses on the application of media theory in the practical process.


 

 

At Cape Naturaliste College Home Economics is a vibrant, busy, dynamic and popular subject. Our aim is to provide students with valuable life skills they can use daily and for future employment. Home Economics forms part of the Technology and Enterprise subject area.

Our overall mission is to encourage sustainability and good budgeting to enable students to gain transferable skills whereby they can adapt recipes at home, be creative in both foods and textiles, and maintain a happy and healthy lifestyle.

All year 7 students participate in a short introductory foods course, which allows them to develop the initial skills necessary for all classes.  If students choose to continue studying this subject they will progress their skill level each year.

Classes are based on practical activities, which complement their learning in the theory lessons. Practical classes encourage skill development and application of the processes and techniques involved in food and textile production. This will enable them to become independent young adults beyond school.

Year 7 Home Economics

Students focus on the basic skills necessary to move forward in this subject. This includes basic knife skills, measuring of ingredients and the preparation of simple healthy meals and snacks. They also learn basic safety and hygiene proficiencies necessary for safe food preparation. 

Students work individually and collaboratively in the practical environment. They utilise the same skills to complete textile products, which demonstrate their understandings of key concepts and technical expertise.

Year 8 Home Economics

Students in Year 8 at Cape Naturaliste College now have the opportunity to work in the textiles area of this subject as well as the regular foods component of the course. Students complete an iPad bag and a decorative drawstring bag. Food preparation in Year 8 investigates healthy breakfasts, simple lunches and dinners and they have the opportunity to create a breakfast and a simple lunch of their own choice. Students also look at sweet treats and learn some basic cake decorating techniques. 

Year 9 Home Economics

Students in Year 9 Home Economics develop their skills further in both foods and textiles. The textile projects involve sewing a multi-purpose shopping bag and a decorative mat for their gift hamper at the end of the year. The students prepare many different recipes over the year, which can all be suitably adapted for use at home in the future including simple lunches and dinners and some sweet treats. The year culminates with students investigating foods for gifts and preparing food for their individual gift hamper.

Year 10 Home Economics

Year 10 students investigate food from other countries and cultures and prepare dishes from Asia and Europe, culminating in both an Asian and Italian shared banquet. In second semester the students research the formal menu and prepare dishes from each of the courses of the menu.  All students study many food celebrations from other countries and prepare a two-course dinner focusing on the cooking of protein.  In the textiles component the students prepare a log cabin pencil case and their sustainable project investigates recycling and producing an up-cycled textile item utilising a pre-loved item from a second hand sore or from home.

Senior School – Year 11 and 12 Food Science and Technology – General

The Food Science and Technology General course provides opportunities for students to explore and develop food-related interests and skills. Food impacts on every aspect of daily life and is essential for maintaining overall health and wellbeing. Students organise, implement and manage production processes in a range of food environments and understand systems that regulate food availability, safety and quality. Knowledge of the sensory, physical, chemical and functional properties of food is applied in practical situations. Students investigate the food supply chain and value-adding techniques applied to food to meet consumer and producer requirements. Principles of dietary planning, adapting recipes, and processing techniques, are considered for specific nutritional needs of demographic groups. Occupational safety and health requirements, safe food handling practices, and a variety of processing techniques, are implemented to produce safe, quality food products. This course may enhance employability and career opportunities in areas that include nutrition, health, food and beverage manufacturing, food processing, community services, hospitality and retail.

This course at Cape Naturaliste College runs for four periods per week, two of which are theory based and two that are practical where the students prepare recipes reflecting their knowledge and skills.

 

 

Students will develop the skills and understanding to engage in music as knowledgeable music makers and audience members.  They will arrange, compose, improvise and perform for various purposes.  They will demonstrate knowledge and understandings of musical elements, materials, ideas, styles and technologies.  They will sing and play instruments to realise their own and others' musical ideas and works.  Students will respond critically to their own and others' musical works and practices, using the concepts of music and terminology to communicate their understandings.  Through listening, performing and composing they will begin to identify cultural, social and historical contexts of music.

Knowledge, understandings and skills involved in the design, development and use of technologies are influenced by, and can play a role in, enriching and transforming societies and our natural, managed and constructed environments.                 

The Western Australian Curriculum: Design and Technologies actively engages students in creating quality designed solutions for identified needs and opportunities across a range of technologies contexts. Students consider the economic, environmental and social impacts of technological change and how the choice and use of technologies contributes to a sustainable future. Decision-making processes are informed by ethical, legal, aesthetic and functional factors.

Through Design and Technologies students manage projects, independently and collaboratively, from conception to realisation. They apply design and systems thinking and design processes to investigate ideas, generate and refine ideas, plan, produce and evaluate designed solutions. They develop their ability to generate innovative designed products, services and environments.

Design and Technologies aims to develop the knowledge, understandings and skills to ensure that, individually and collaboratively, students:

    •    produce designed solutions suitable for a range of Technologies contexts by selecting and manipulating a range of materials, systems, components,tools and equipment creatively, competently and safely; and managing processes.

    •   understand the roles and responsibilities of people in design and technologies occupations and how they contribute to society. 

     Design and Technologies students learn about technologies in society through different technologies contexts (Engineering principles and systems; Food and fibre production; Food specialisations; and Materials and technologies specialisations) as they create designed solutions.

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